1921
Volume s1-27, Issue 6
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
USD

Abstract

Human illness acquired from lower animals, either domesticated or wild, constitutes a formidable hazard. With the aid of fourteen collaborators, Dr. Hull presents a review of thirty diseases, chiefly infectious, which constitute a menace to man. Although some of these are of waning importance in the United States, the differentiation and recognition of others previously unknown, serves to maintain these risks at a high level. Furthermore, domesticated animals may participate in the spread of some characteristically human infections. Although the diseases reviewed are considered from the standpoint of bacteriology, pathology, clinical symptoms in animals, and diagnosis, especial emphasis is given to epidemiology and prevention, along which lines lie the greatest usefulness of the book. Therapy receives scanty attention. The revision required for this edition brings the information presented well down to date. It is likely the work will be more useful to public health administrators than to any other professional group.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1947.s1-27.6.TMs1-270060790a
1947-11-01
2017-11-23
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