1921
Volume s1-26, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Summary and Conclusions

Studies to determine possible mosquito vectors of (nocturnally-periodic strain) in the United States were continued. A total of 1314 dissections was made of mosquitoes from 14 species.

Seventy-eight per cent of examined 9½ days or longer after infection contained infective larvae, and an additional 13 per cent contained larvae in late stages of development. A total infectibility rate of 91 per cent was obtained with this species.

Thirty-three per cent of in late dissections contained infective larvae, and an additional 34 per cent contained larvae in late stages of development. The infectibility rate of this species was 67 per cent.

Occasional development of the larvae to advanced or infective stages was observed in the following species: , 3 per cent; , 2 per cent; , 3 per cent.

No development beyond the first stage was observed in , and .

Studies were not completed on , and . However, on the basis of 50 or more late dissections of each species, none of these was a good intermediate host with the exception of which permitted development of the larvae to late and infective stages in 14 of 49 specimens.

The few dissections obtained of and were negative.

It is concluded that and are capable of serving as vectors of should other conditions prevail for the spread of the parasite. Incomplete studies on indicate that this species also might be involved as a transmitter although to a lesser extent. , and might serve as occasional vectors, although their low infectibility rates preclude their playing a major rôle in the spread of the disease. , and are incapable of transmitting infection. Finally, although studies are not completed, it is apparent that , and could not serve as vectors of .

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1946.s1-26.699
1946-09-01
2017-09-22
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