1921
Volume s1-24, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Summary

  • 1.  The records of 100 patients who died of estivo-autumnal malaria and upon whom autopsies were performed at the Board of Health Laboratory, Gorgas Hospital, Ancon, Canal Zone, between 1925 and 1942 were reviewed. One and six-tenths per cent of all autopsies (6,214) performed during that period were on patients who died of estivo-autumnal malaria.
  • 2.  Deaths occurred in all months, although questionable peaks in May–June and December–January were present.
  • 3.  Of 39 Panamanians in the series, 34 were children 10 years or younger.
  • 4.  The duration of symptoms before hospitalization varied from four and one-half hours to twenty-one days. Twenty-three patients had symptoms of not more than one day before hospitalization and yet they died.
  • 5.  The degree of parasitization of the peripheral blood was not a wholly adequate index of the seriousness of the illness since 12 patients with light infections died within twenty-four hours of admission despite heavy treatment with quinine.
  • 6.  Some of the classical signs and symptoms of malaria such as chills, headache, vomiting, palpable liver, and spleen were absent in one third to one half of the patients.
  • 7.  The clinical and pathologic changes which have been described in shock were recorded in one third of the patients upon whom classification of the type of death was possible.
  • 8.  No correlation between cerebral malaria as noted clinically and cerebral plugging as recorded at autopsy was apparent in our material.
  • 9.  Two case reports illustrating the occurrence of shock in patients with malaria were presented. Anti-shock measures were believed to have saved the life of one patient.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1944.s1-24.317
1944-09-01
2017-11-17
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  • Received : 10 Feb 1944

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