1921
Volume s1-23, Issue 6
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Summary and Conclusions

Thirty American albino deer mice () were inoculated intraperitoneally with the D. C. rat strain of and were killed in groups at daily intervals from the 2nd through the 7th day. Jaundice, internal hemorrhage, and leptospirae in the blood were first noted on the 5th day. Jaundice and hemorrhage rapidly increased in degree and were marked by the 7th day. Leptospirae were present in the blood in great numbers by the 6th day, but the number had decreased by the 7th day and one mouse (previously positive) was negative at this time.

The kidney cortex, mainly the inner portion, showed progressive changes in the tubular epithelium, including cytoplasmic swelling, dispersion of granules, nuclear enlargement, indistinctness of brush border and, in late stages, lack of adhesion between cells and focal necrosis. Interstitial cellular infiltration was slight and irregular.

Pathologic alterations of the liver comprised cell enlargement, increase in number of nuclei per cell, swelling and oxyphilia of some Kupffer cells, necrosis of an occasional parenchymal cell, and disruption of liver cords due to loss of cohesion between cells. Erythrophagia was present on and after the 5th day and was progressive. In the spleen erythrophagia frequently was quite prominent. Leptospirae were abundant in the liver, much less numerous in the kidney, and were found in the heart and lungs in very small numbers.

The hepatic damage in believed sufficient to explain the occurrence of jaundice in experimental icterohemorrhagic spirochetosis in deer mice. That blood destruction may be a contributing factor is admitted but certain evidence presented suggests otherwise. Intra-hepatic biliary obstruction was not observed.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1943.s1-23.607
1943-11-01
2017-11-25
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  • Received : 29 Jan 1943

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