1921
Volume s1-17, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
USD

Abstract

Summary

  • 1.  The reported incidence of yellow fever is no safe index of its occurrence in endemic zones.
  • 2.  Although visible urban and maritime outbreaks may decline and even cease entirely for a time, there is a vast, previously silent reservoir of infection in the interior of South America.
  • 3.  Yellow fever infection due to has been much more widespread in the interior of Northeast Brazil than was believed, even though this area had long been under special observation. Aegypti-transmitted fever in this area did not spontaneously disappear following the organization of antiaegypti campaigns in the principal centers of population.
  • 4.  Yellow fever endemicity, instead of being limited to the coast of Northeast Brazil as was believed, extends to all of Brazil except a few of the southern states, to Bolivia, Paraguay, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela, involving many districts in which does not exist.
  • 5.  Widely varying percentages of immunes have been found in proved endemic regions, depending upon whether transmission is due to or occurs in the absence of this mosquito.
  • 6.  There is no evidence of recent yellow fever outbreaks in any of the important Pacific or Caribbean ports of South America.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1937.s1-17.457
1937-07-01
2017-11-19
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