1921
Volume s1-13, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
USD

Abstract

During my first year of practice in Atlanta I treated three patients with aggravated amebic diarrhea. From this experience dates my interest in amebiasis. My opinion that this disease is of medical and economic importance in Georgia has steadily grown.

In this paper is presented () a review of the epidemiology of amebiasis; () statistics from the hospitals in several of the larger Southern cities relative to the number of cases of amebiasis diagnosed in the five-year period of 1927 to 1931, inclusive. The number of cases occurring in urban and rural communities and the incidence of amebiasis in 1103 private patients is reported.

Epidemiology. Amebiasis is endemic rather than epidemic and is one of the widest spread diseases that we know. For this reason the factors having to do with its dissemination are variable in different localities and difficult to determine. Man becomes infected by swallowing material containing the encysted form of the endameba.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1933.s1-13.317
1933-05-01
2017-11-23
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1933.s1-13.317
Loading

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error