1921
Volume s1-11, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
USD

Abstract

Summary

  • 1.  Stegomyia mosquitoes captured in houses in São Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, did not produce yellow fever when injected into .
  • 2.  Mosquitoes which had already digested a meal of immune blood, gave rise to no immunity when injected into or fed upon monkeys.
  • 3.  Mosquitoes which had already digested one or more meals of immune blood became infective after feeding on an animal with yellow fever.
  • 4.  In mosquitoes which had already digested a meal of infectious blood, the ingestion of immune blood had no influence on the subsequent development of infectivity.
  • 5.  Two batches of mosquitoes which fed on a mixture of infectious blood and immune serum did not become infective. The mixture itself produced yellow fever when injected directly into a monkey. A similar blood mixture with saline solution substituted for the immune serum proved infectious upon direct inoculation and gave rise to infectivity upon ingestion by two batches of mosquitoes.
  • 6.  Mosquitoes which took an interrupted meal, first upon an immune monkey and immediately afterward on an infected monkey, developed infectivity. A similar lot, which fed first on the infected and secondly on the immune animal, produced no disease when injected into a monkey. However, the latter was subsequently immune to a test dose of virus.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.1931.s1-11.31
1931-01-01
2017-11-23
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