1921
Volume 103, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Intensive care unit–acquired bloodstream infections (ICU-BSI) are frequent and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. We conducted this study to describe the epidemiology and the prognosis of ICU-BSI in our ICU and to search for factors associated with mortality at 28 days. For this, we retrospectively studied ICU-BSI in the ICU of the Cayenne General Hospital, from January 2013 to June 2019. Intensive care unit–acquired bloodstream infections were diagnosed in 9.5% of admissions (10.3 ICU-BSI/1,000 days). The median delay to the first ICU-BSI was 9 days. The ICU-BSI was primitive in 44% of cases and secondary to ventilator-acquired pneumonia in 25% of cases. The main isolated microorganisms were Enterobacteriaceae in 67.7% of patients. They were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers in 27.6% of cases. Initial antibiotic therapy was appropriate in 65.1% of cases. Factors independently associated with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) as the causative microorganism of ICU-BSI were ESBL-PE carriage before ICU-BSI (odds ratio [OR]: 7.273; 95% CI: 2.876–18.392; < 0.000) and prior exposure to fluoroquinolones (OR: 4.327; 95% CI: 1.120–16.728; = 0.034). The sensitivity of ESBL-PE carriage to predict ESBL-PE as the causative microorganism of ICU-BSI was 64.9% and specificity was 81.2%. Mortality at 28 days was 20.6% in the general population. Factors independently associated with mortality at day 28 from the occurrence of ICU-BSI were traumatic category of admission (OR: 0.346; 95% CI: 0.134–0.894; = 0.028) and septic shock on the day of ICU-BSI (OR: 3.317; 95% CI: 1.561–7.050; = 0.002). Mortality rate was independent of the causative organism.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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Supplemental appendixes

  • Received : 28 Nov 2019
  • Accepted : 01 Mar 2020
  • Published online : 20 Apr 2020
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