1921
Volume 103, Issue 1_Suppl
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

The Schistosomiasis Consortium for Operational Research and Evaluation (SCORE) was established in late 2008 to conduct operational research to inform global health practices related to the control and elimination of schistosomiasis. The greatest part of the SCORE investment has been in multiyear, long-term efforts, including cluster-randomized trials of gaining and sustaining control of schistosomiasis, trials on elimination of schistosomiasis, and diagnostic test development and evaluation. In the course of planning and conducting SCORE studies, critical questions were raised that could be answered relatively quickly by collecting, collating, and synthesizing existing data. Through its Rapid Answers Project (RAP), the SCORE conducted seven systematic reviews, including four associated meta-analyses, on issues related to screening for schistosomiasis, enhancing mass drug administration, treatment impacts, and the efficacy of snail control for prevention of human schistosomiasis. This article summarizes the findings of the seven RAP reports and provides links to the studies and their supporting information.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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  • Received : 30 Oct 2019
  • Accepted : 16 Dec 2019
  • Published online : 12 May 2020
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