1921
Volume 103, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

The relationship between malaria and malnutrition is complicated, and existence of one may predispose or exacerbate the other. We evaluated the relationship between malaria parasitemia and nutritional status in children living in communities participating in a cluster-randomized trial of biannual azithromycin compared with placebo for prevention of childhood mortality. Data were collected during the low malaria transmission and low food insecurity season. Parasitemia was not associated with weight-for-height -score (24 months: = 0.11 azithromycin communities, = 0.75 placebo communities), weight-for-age -score (24 months: = 0.83 azithromycin, = 0.78 placebo), height-for-age -score (24 months: = 0.30 azithromycin, = 0.87 placebo), or mid-upper arm circumference (24 months: = 0.12 azithromycin, = 0.56 placebo). There was no statistically significant evidence of a difference in the relationship in communities receiving azithromycin or placebo. During the low transmission season, there was no evidence that malaria parasitemia and impaired nutritional status co-occur in children.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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  • Received : 23 Jul 2019
  • Accepted : 07 Oct 2019
  • Published online : 17 Feb 2020
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