1921
Volume 103, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Biannual mass azithromycin distribution to children younger than 5 years has been shown to reduce all-cause mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Antibiotic-sparing approaches to azithromycin distribution, such as targeting to younger children who are at higher risk of mortality, are being considered by policymakers. We evaluated the absolute number of deaths averted in the study in three age-groups: 1–5 months, 1–11 months, and 1–59 months. The number of deaths averted decreased from 729 (95% CI 492 to 966) in children aged 1–59 months to 297 (95% CI 168 to 427) and 126 (95% CI 43 to 209) in the 1- to 11-month and 1- to 5-month groups, respectively. Limiting antibiotic treatment to a subgroup of higher risk children may result in fewer deaths averted compared with treating all preschool children.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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  • Received : 28 Apr 2019
  • Accepted : 04 Sep 2019
  • Published online : 17 Feb 2020
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