1921
Volume 101, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is associated with adverse events (AE). Patients treated with an MDR TB regimen in Hospital Nossa Senhora da Paz, Cubal, Angola, were prospectively enrolled from May 2013 to July 2015. Baseline characteristics, AE, and clinical and microbiological outcomes were recorded. A total of 216 patients were treated with an MDR TB regimen and 179 (82.9%) patients developed at least one AE. The most common AE were elevation of liver enzymes (46.8% of patients), elevated creatinine (44.4% of patients), and ototoxicity (40.7% of patients). Previous TB treatment was associated with the occurrence of AE (OR 4.89, 95% CI: 2.09–11.46, < 0.001) and months on treatment was associated to severe AE (OR 1.11 95% CI: 1.04–1.18, = 0.001). Successful treatment was achieved in 117 (54.2%) patients. Incidence of AE was associated with an unsuccessful outcome (OR 1.23, 95% CI: 1.09–1.40, = 0.001). Patients treated with MDR TB treatment frequently experience AE, and these are related with previous TB treatment and duration of treatment. Given the high percentage of patients experiencing AE and the low treatment success rates, more effective and less toxic drugs to treat MDR TB are urgently needed.

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Supplemental appendix, figure, and table

  • Received : 01 Mar 2019
  • Accepted : 31 May 2019
  • Published online : 22 Jul 2019
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