1921
Volume 101, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

In 2016, the World Health Assembly endorsed the Global Health Sector Strategy on Viral Hepatitis, which calls for elimination of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by 2030 (definition: ≤ 0.1% hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] prevalence among children aged 5 years). The burden of chronic HBV infection among children in Haiti is unknown. We conducted a nationally representative cross-sectional serological survey among 5- to 7-year-old children based on a two-stage cluster design with two strata: West (includes metropolitan Port-au-Prince) and non-West (all other departments). We collected demographic, socioeconomic, and vaccination history data and tested for HBsAg using a rapid point-of-care test. We estimated HBsAg prevalence and evaluated the association of HBV infection with vaccination history, demographics, and socioeconomic characteristics. Of the 1,152 children, seven (0.5%, 95% CI: 0.2–1.2) were HBsAg positive. The HBsAg prevalence varied by region (West: 0.1%, 95% CI: 0.01–0.9; non-West: 0.7%, 95% CI: 0.2–1.9) ( = 0.1), gender (males: 0.7%, 95% CI: 0.2–2.4; females: 0.2%, 95% CI: 0.05–1.1) ( = 0.3), and caregiver’s education level (none: 0.8%, 95% CI: 0.2–3.1; some or completed primary: 0.5%, 95% CI: 0.1–1.8; some secondary: 0.4%, 95% CI: 0.1–1.8; secondary and higher: 0.0%, 95% CI: 0–0), although the differences were not statistically significant. None of the HBsAg-positive children had documented vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine (HepB). Haiti’s chronic HBV infection prevalence among children is low; however, it is above the elimination target. To reach elimination, Haiti needs to achieve high coverage with the three HepB doses and introduce a HepB birth dose.

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  • Received : 07 Feb 2019
  • Accepted : 30 Mar 2019
  • Published online : 20 May 2019
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