1921
Volume 101, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

We explored spatial variation in the prevalence of established molecular markers of antimalarial resistance across a geographically diverse, highland region of western Uganda. We identified CQ resistance transporter 76T mutations in all pools, but there was no evidence of spatial differences across village-based strata defined by either altitude or river valley. In contrast, we identified a significant inverse association between altitude and the prevalence of multidrug resistance 1 mutations with the largest proportion of Y184F mutations observed in the low-elevation, high-transmission villages. These results demonstrate the substantial heterogeneity in resistance markers observed across geographic settings, even at relatively small scales, but highlight the complex nature of these ecological relationships.

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Supplemental Materials

  • Received : 26 Jan 2019
  • Accepted : 23 Jul 2019
  • Published online : 19 Aug 2019
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