1921
Volume 101, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Healthcare workforce shortages are continuing to increase worldwide with more profound deficits seen in rural communities in both developed and developing countries. These deficits impede progress towards heath equity and global health initiatives including the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Medical training has supported the idea that having a rural background influences future practice in rural settings. With a majority of global health experiences taking place in rural settings, there is an opportunity for health profession programs to take advantage of expanding global health education to encourage future practice in rural settings and address inequalities in workforce distribution.

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  • Received : 22 Jan 2019
  • Accepted : 20 May 2019
  • Published online : 17 Jun 2019
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