1921
Volume 101 Number 4_Suppl
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Strengthening routine immunization is one of the four prongs of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Achieving this requires improving immunization coverage in hard-to-reach areas. The objectives of this analysis were to assess levels of oral polio vaccination coverage and challenges in pastoral and semi-pastoral regions in Ethiopia. The analysis included vaccination-related data for children aged 12–23 months from the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) and from surveys carried out by the CORE Group Polio Project (CGPP) in 2013, 2015, and 2017. The EDHS data were from the entire regions (states) of Somali; Oromia; Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples; Benshangul-Gumuz; and Gambella, whereas the CGPP data were for portions of these states where the CGPP was working and consisted entirely of pastoralist or semi-pastoralist populations. The overall polio immunization coverage rate showed upward trend from 39.6% in the 2011 EDHS to 72.6% for 2017 survey of children in the CGPP intervention areas. The evidence suggests that the CGPP was able to achieve increasing levels of coverage in the hardest-to-reach areas of these states and that the levels were higher than those achieved in the states as a whole. The strategies used by the CGPP/Ethiopia to increase coverage appear to have been effective. Other characteristics associated with full polio immunization included mother’s religion and education, whether the mother had heard about polio, knowledge on the effect of many polio vaccine doses, and age at first polio immunization.

[open-access] This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

The graphs shown below represent data from March 2017
/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0022
2019-10-03
2019-11-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/14761645/101/4_Suppl/tpmd190022.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0022&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. GPEI, 2015. Ethiopia Successfully Interrupts Wild Polio Virus Transmission. Available at: https://afro.who.int/news/ethiopia-successfully-interrupts-wild-polio-virus-transmission. Accessed January 1, 2019. [Google Scholar]
  2. Losey L, 2019. The CORE Group Polio Project: an overview of its history and its contributions to the global polio eradication initiative. Am J Trop Med Hyg 101 (Suppl 4): 414. [Google Scholar]
  3. Ethiopia Central Statistical Agency, ICF International, 2016. Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey 2016. Available at: https://www.dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/FR328/hFR328.pdf. Accessed December 26, 2018. [Google Scholar]
  4. Stamidis K, Bologna L, Losey L, , 2018. CORE Group Polio Project (CGPP) Final Evaluation Report 2017. Available at: https://coregroup.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/CGPP-Evaluation-Report-FINAL-5-10-2018.pdf. Accessed January 1, 2019. [Google Scholar]
  5. Asegedew B, Tessema F, Perry H, Bisrat F, , 2019. The CORE Group Polio Project's community volunteers and polio eradication in Ethiopia: self-reports of their activities, knowledge, and contributions. Am J Trop Med Hyg 101 (Suppl 4): 4551. [Google Scholar]
  6. Ethiopia Central Statistical Agency, ICF International, 2012. Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey 2011 Available at: https://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1860/Demographic%20Health%20Survey%202011%20Ethiopia%20Final%20Report.pdf. Accessed January 1, 2019. [Google Scholar]
  7. Parry NM, , 2017. Despite Progress Towards Global Eradication of Polio, Measles, & Rubella, Challenges Remain. Available at: http://www.contagionlive.com/news/despite-progress-towards-global-eradication-of-polio-measles-and-rubella-challenges-remain. Accessed January 1, 2019. [Google Scholar]
  8. Mohamud AN, Feleke A, Worku W, Kifle M, Sharma HR, , 2014. Immunization coverage of 12–23 months old children and associated factors in Jigjiga district, Somali National Regional State, Ethiopia. BMC Public Health 14: 865. [Google Scholar]
  9. Animaw W, Taye W, Merdekios B, Tilahun M, Ayele G, , 2014. Expanded program of immunization coverage and associated factors among children age 12–23 months in Arba Minch town and Zuria District, southern Ethiopia, 2013. BMC Public Health 14: 464. [Google Scholar]
  10. Kiptoo E, Esilaba M, Kobia G, Ngure R, , 2015. Factors influencing low immunization coverage among children between 12–23 months in East Pokot, Baringo country, Kenya. Int J Vaccin Vaccination 1: 00012. [Google Scholar]
  11. Khan MT, Zaheer S, Shafique K, , 2017. Maternal education, empowerment, economic status and child polio vaccination uptake in Pakistan: a population based cross sectional study. BMJ Open 7: e013853. [Google Scholar]
  12. Adokiya MN, Baguune B, Ndago JA, , 2017. Evaluation of immunization coverage and its associated factors among children 12–23 months of age in Techiman Municipality, Ghana, 2016. Arch Public Health 75: 28. [Google Scholar]
  13. Oliveira MF, Martinez EZ, Rocha JS, , 2014. Factors associated with vaccination coverage in children < 5 years in Angola. Rev Saúde Pública 48: 906915. [Google Scholar]
  14. Khan QH, Sinha T, Shrivastatva PK, Brahmapurkar KP, Brahmapurkar VK, , 2015. Assessment of immunization status among children aged 12–23 months, at an urban slum area of Jagdalpur city, Bastar. Healthline J 6: 5560. [Google Scholar]
  15. National Center for I, Respiratory D, , 2011. General recommendations on immunization–recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep 60: 164. [Google Scholar]
  16. Fadnes LT, Nankabirwa V, Sommerfelt H, Tylleskar T, Tumwine JK, Engebretsen IM, Group PES, , 2011. Is vaccination coverage a good indicator of age-appropriate vaccination? A prospective study from Uganda. Vaccine 29: 35643570. [Google Scholar]
  17. Sadoh AE, Eregie CO, , 2009. Timeliness and completion rate of immunization among Nigerian children attending a clinic-based immunization service. J Health Popul Nutr 27: 391395. [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0022
Loading
/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0022
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplemental materials

  • Received : 08 Jan 2019
  • Accepted : 25 Jun 2019
  • Published online : 03 Oct 2019

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error