1921
Volume 101, Issue 6
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with . Unclear transmission, no available vaccine, and suboptimal treatment regimens hamper the control of this disease. Carefully designed preclinical research is needed to address these shortcomings. In vivo imaging (IVIS, Perkin Elmer, Waltham, MA) of infection is an emerging tool that permits monitoring of disease progression and reduces the need to using large numbers of mice at different time-points during the experiment, as individual mice can be imaged at multiple time-points. We aimed to further describe the use of in vivo imaging (IVIS) in BU. We studied the detection of in experimentally infected BALB/c mouse tails and the subsequent histopathology and immune response in this pilot study. IVIS-monitoring was performed weekly in ten infected BALB/c mice to measure light emitted as a proxy for bacterial load. Nine of 10 (90%) BALB/c mice infected subcutaneously with 3.3 × 10 JKD8049 (containing pMV306 hsp16+luxG13) exhibited light emission from the site of infection, indicating growth in vivo, whereas only five of 10 (50%) animals developed clinical signs of the disease. Specific antibody titers were detected within 2 weeks of the infection. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 were elevated in animals with pathology Histopathology revealed clusters of acid-fast bacilli in the subcutaneous tissue, with macrophage infiltration and granuloma formation resembling human BU. Our study successfully showed the utility of IVIS monitoring and lays a foundation for further research.

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  • Received : 02 Dec 2018
  • Accepted : 08 Aug 2019
  • Published online : 07 Oct 2019
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