1921
Volume 100, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Adults who have not grown up in a malaria-endemic area may experience severe malaria soon after entering a malarious area. Such mortality is usually limited to a short period of time (months), after which they are thought to be “immune.” Such anti-disease immunity may be more accurately considered as tolerance. Malaria rates of British soldiers during the Second World War reflected their time with suppressed infections and the transmission levels. Black workers from non-endemic areas on the Panama Canal experienced higher initial mortality and infection rates than co-located white workers for , whereas the known genetic resistance of blacks to reversed these rates. The ethnic differences observed in malaria rates may have more to do with acquired tolerance than genetic resistance. Long-term (years) sub-patent infections may maintain host tolerance, and elimination of malaria infections may place these adults at subsequent risk of severe malaria.

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  • Received : 14 Nov 2018
  • Accepted : 28 Nov 2018
  • Published online : 21 Jan 2019
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