1921
Volume 100, Issue 5
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Maternal rectovaginal colonization is the major risk factor for early-onset neonatal sepsis due to Group B (GBS), a major cause of early life morbidity and mortality. Transmission generally occurs perinatally from colonized mothers to infants. Vaccines targeting a subset of GBS serotypes are under development, but GBS epidemiology remains poorly understood in many African nations. We performed a cross-sectional study of GBS colonization among pregnant women at two sites in Botswana, a country with minimal prior GBS carriage data. We found a rectovaginal colonization rate of 19%, comparable with studies in other regions; however, we also noted a striking predominance of serotype V (> 45% of strains). Although further studies are required to delineate the burden of invasive GBS disease in Botswana and the generalizability of type V epidemiology, these data provide a useful baseline for understanding the potential local impact of GBS prevention strategies, including vaccines.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

The graphs shown below represent data from March 2017
/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0847
2019-03-25
2020-09-19
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/14761645/100/5/tpmd180847.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0847&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Da Cunha V et al., 2014. Streptococcus agalactiae clones infecting humans were selected and fixed through the extensive use of tetracycline. Nat Commun 5: 4544.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Verani JR, McGee L, Schrag SJ, 2010. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease—revised guidelines from CDC, 2010. MMWR Recomm Rep 59: 136.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Ginsberg GM, Eidelman AI, Shinwell E, Anis E, Peyser R, Lotan Y, 2013. Should Israel screen all mothers-to-be to prevent early-onset of neonatal group B streptococcal disease? A cost-utility analysis. Isr J Health Policy Res 2: 6.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Kobayashi M, Vekemans J, Baker CJ, Ratner AJ, Le Doare K, Schrag SJ, 2016. Group B Streptococcus vaccine development: present status and future considerations, with emphasis on perspectives for low and middle income countries. F1000Res 5: 2355.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Madrid L et al., 2017. Infant group B streptococcal disease incidence and serotypes worldwide: systematic review and meta-analyses. Clin Infect Dis 65: S160S172.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Russell NJ et al., 2017. Maternal colonization with group B Streptococcus and serotype distribution worldwide: systematic review and meta-analyses. Clin Infect Dis 65: S100S111.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dzanibe S, Madhi SA, 2018. Systematic review of the clinical development of group B Streptococcus serotype-specific capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines. Expert Rev Vaccines 17: 635651.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Khatami A, Randis TM, Chamby A, Hooven TA, Gegick M, Suzman E, A’Hearn-Thomas B, Steenhoff AP, Ratner AJ, 2018. Improving the sensitivity of real-time PCR detection of group B Streptococcus using consensus sequence-derived oligonucleotides. Open Forum Infect Dis 5: ofy164.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Breeding KM, Ragipani B, Lee KD, Malik M, Randis TM, Ratner AJ, 2016. Real-time PCR-based serotyping of Streptococcus agalactiae. Sci Rep 6: 38523.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Ferrieri P, Hillier SL, Krohn MA, Moore D, Paoletti LC, Flores AE, 2004. Characterization of vaginal & rectal colonization with multiple serotypes of group B streptococci using multiple colony picks. Indian J Med Res 119 (Suppl): 208212.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kwatra G, Cunnington MC, Merrall E, Adrian PV, Ip M, Klugman KP, Tam WH, Madhi SA, 2016. Prevalence of maternal colonisation with group B Streptococcus: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Infect Dis 16: 10761084.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Madhi SA et al., 2016. Safety and immunogenicity of an investigational maternal trivalent group B Streptococcus vaccine in healthy women and their infants: a randomised phase 1b/2 trial. Lancet Infect Dis 16: 923934.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Anderson AL et al., 2017. Updates on the Development of a Multivalent Group B Streptococcal Vaccine. International Society for Vaccines Annual Congress, Abstract O1.3.
  14. Brochet M, Couve E, Bercion R, Sire JM, Glaser P, 2009. Population structure of human isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae from Dakar and Bangui. J Clin Microbiol 47: 800803.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Moyo SR, Maeland JA, Bergh K, 2002. Typing of human isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) strains from Zimbabwe. J Med Microbiol 51: 595600.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Suara RO, Adegbola RA, Baker CJ, Secka O, Mulholland EK, Greenwood BM, 1994. Carriage of group B Streptococci in pregnant Gambian mothers and their infants. J Infect Dis 170: 13161319.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Blumberg HM, Stephens DS, Modansky M, Erwin M, Elliot J, Facklam RR, Schuchat A, Baughman W, Farley MM, 1996. Invasive group B streptococcal disease: the emergence of serotype V. J Infect Dis 173: 365373.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Skoff TH et al., 2009. Increasing burden of invasive group B streptococcal disease in nonpregnant adults, 1990–2007. Clin Infect Dis 49: 8592.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0847
Loading
/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0847
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Received : 22 Oct 2018
  • Accepted : 03 Feb 2019
  • Published online : 25 Mar 2019
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error