1921
Volume 100, Issue 6
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Most alphaviruses are mosquito-borne and can cause severe disease in domesticated animals and humans. The most notable recent outbreak in the Americas was the 2014 chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreak affecting millions and producing disease highlighted by rash and arthralgia. Chikungunya virus is a member of the Semliki Forest (SF) serocomplex, and before its arrival in the Americas, two other member of the SF complex, Una (UNAV) and Mayaro (MAYV) viruses, were circulating in Central and South America. This study examined whether antibodies from convalescent CHIKV patients could cross-neutralize UNAV and MAYV. Considerable cross-neutralization of both viruses was observed, suggesting that exposure to CHIKV can produce antibodies that may mitigate infection with UNAV or MAYV. Understanding the impact of CHIKV exposure on population susceptibility to other emerging viruses may help predict outbreaks; moreover, identification of cross-reactive immune responses among alphaviruses may lead to the development of vaccines targeting multiple viruses.

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  • Received : 14 Sep 2018
  • Accepted : 13 Jan 2019
  • Published online : 22 Apr 2019
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