1921
Volume 100, Issue 6
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Neonatal sepsis is the second most prevalent cause of neonatal deaths in low- and middle-income countries, and many countries lack epidemiologic data on the local causes of neonatal sepsis. During April 2015–November 2016, we prospectively collected 128 blood cultures from neonates admitted with clinical sepsis to the provincial hospital in Takeo, Cambodia, to describe the local epidemiology. Two percent ( = 3) of positive blood cultures identified were Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and were presumed pathogens, whereas 10% ( = 13) of positive blood cultures identified were likely contaminants, consistent with findings in other published studies. No group B was identified in any positive cultures. The presence of GNB as the primary pathogens could help influence local treatment guidelines.

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  • Received : 07 Sep 2018
  • Accepted : 20 Feb 2019
  • Published online : 15 Apr 2019
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