1921
Volume 100, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Abstract.

Chagas disease is one of the most significant systemic parasitosis in Latin America, caused by , which is mainly transmitted by hematophagous insects, the triatomines. This research was carried out in both domestic and wild environments throughout a Northeastern rural locality. Triatomines were captured in both peridomicile and wild environments, obtaining 508 specimens of triatomines, of which 99.6% were . Insects were captured in 10 (18.5%) peridomiciles with an average of 8.3 triatomines per residence. nymphs and adults were found in six peridomiciles, generating a 11.1% colonization. No infection was detected in the 447 peridomestic insects analyzed. On the other hand, of the 55 sylvatic molecularly examined for , 12 (21%) were positive, all harboring I. The blood meal analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay from gut content revealed that both peridomestic and wild triatomine populations fed mainly on birds, refractory to the parasite, which may explain the null rate of natural infection prevalence in the domestic environment. However, infected triatomines for potential home infestation within the radius of insect dispersion capacity were registered in rock outcrops around the dwellings. Anthropogenic environmental influences are able to rapidly alter these scenarios. Therefore, to avoid disease transmission to humans, we recommend constant vector control combined with periodic serological surveillance. The associated methodology presented herein may serve as a model for early detections of risk factors for Chagas disease transmission in the Brazilian Northeast.

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Supplemental Figure

  • Received : 07 Jun 2018
  • Accepted : 21 Sep 2018
  • Published online : 10 Dec 2018

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