1921
Volume 101, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae that has been commonly implicated as a causative agent of diarrheal infection in humans and animals. Recent outbreaks of in both developing and developed countries have raised public health concerns. Several studies have suggested that can cause diarrhea by invading the intestinal mucosa, although its pathogenicity has not been well established. Often routine laboratory investigations that seek etiological agents of diarrhea do not actively pursue detection. Therefore, routine laboratory diagnosis should be given more attention for better understanding the epidemiology and pathogenicity of .

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  • Received : 02 May 2018
  • Accepted : 20 Feb 2019
  • Published online : 17 Jun 2019
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