1921
Volume 99, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
USD

Abstract

Abstract.

The complex relationship between malnutrition and malaria affects morbidity and mortality in children younger than 5 years, particularly in parts of sub-Saharan Africa where these conditions occur together seasonally. Previous research on this relationship has been inconclusive. Here, we examine the association between anthropometric indicators and malaria infection in a population-based sample of children younger than 5 years in Niger. This cross-sectional study is a secondary analysis of a cluster-randomized trial comparing treatment strategies for trachoma in Niger. We included children aged 6–60 months residing in the 48 communities enrolled in the trial who completed anthropometric and malaria infection assessments at the final study visit. We evaluated the association between anthropometric indicators, including height-for-age -score (HAZ) and weight-for-age -score (WAZ) and indicators of malaria infection, including malaria parasitemia and clinical malaria. In May 2013, we collected data from 1,649 children. Of these, 780 (47.3%) were positive for malaria parasitemia and 401 (24.3%) had clinical malaria. In models of malaria parasitemia, the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00–1.10) for HAZ and 1.07 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.15) for WAZ. In models of clinical malaria, the aOR was 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02–1.11) for HAZ and 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01–1.19) for WAZ. Overall, we did not find evidence of an association between most anthropometric indicators and malaria infection. Greater height may be associated with an increased risk of clinical malaria.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0214
2018-09-05
2018-09-20
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0214
Loading
/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0214
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Received : 12 Mar 2018
  • Accepted : 06 Jun 2018

Most Cited This Month

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error