1921
Volume 99, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

Abstract.

A retrospective study was conducted to identify the risk factors associated with bacteremia in infants and children in Guadeloupe, French West Indies. The 171 patients with infection seen between 2010 and 2014 included 155 (90.6%) with acute gastroenteritis, of whom 42 (27.1%) had concomitant bacteremia, and 16 (9.4%) with primary bacteremia. Most cases (97.7%) were in infants and children with no underlying health condition. Two subspecies were recovered: ( = 161, 94.2%) and ( = 10, 5.8%). All but one (serovar Typhi) were non-typhoidal . The most common serovars were Panama ( = 57, 33.3% of isolates) and Arechavaleta ( = 28, 16.4%). Univariate analysis showed a strong association only between age > 6 months and infection with the Panama or Arechavaleta serovar ( = 0.002). The rate of resistance to all classes of antibiotics during the study period was low (< 15%); however, the detection of one extended-spectrum beta-lactamase–producing strain highlights the need for continued monitoring of antimicrobial drug susceptibility. Infection with Panama ( < 0.001) or Arechavaleta ( < 0.001) serovar was significantly associated with bacteremia in a multivariate analysis. These serovars are probably poorly adapted to humans or are more virulent. A delay between onset of symptoms and hospital admission > 5 days ( = 0.01), vomiting ( = 0.001), and increased respiratory rate ( = 0.001) contributed independently to bacteremia in the multivariate analysis. Thus, if non-typhoidal infection is suspected, blood should be cultured and antibiotic treatment initiated in all patients who meet these criteria.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0192
2018-09-05
2018-09-24
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  • Received : 05 Mar 2018
  • Accepted : 04 Jun 2018

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