1921
image of Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence for Sex-Dependent Differences in the Outcome of Leishmania infantum Infection
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645
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Abstract

causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil. We previously observed that VL is more common in males than females living in endemic neighborhoods, despite similar exposure. Using a larger sample, we document that VL is more common in males than females, but only after puberty. BALB/c and C57BL/6 mouse models confirmed that there is a biological basis for male susceptibility to symptomatic VL, showing higher parasite burdens in males than females. Female C57BL/6 mice generated more antigen-induced cytokines associated with curative responses (interferon-γ, interleukin [IL]-1β). Males expressed higher levels of IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor, which are linked to exacerbated disease. Different parasite lines entered or survived at a higher rate in macrophages of male- than female-origin. These results suggest that males are inherently more susceptible to than females and that mice are a valid model to study this sex-dependent difference.

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/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0563
2017-11-20
2017-12-17
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0563
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  • Published online : 20 Nov 2017
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