1921
Volume 98, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Current guidelines for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC) recommend the use of the lentil lectin-bound glycoprotein enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot assay (LLGP-EITB) as the reference standard for serological testing. In response to the drawbacks involved with the use of the LLGP-EITB, a recombinant T24H antigen (rT24H) EITB assay was developed, with promising results. However, the test has yet to be evaluated among individuals from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of the rT24H EITB assay for the detection of NCC cases in a panel of serum samples ( = 366, of which 173 patients presented with epileptic seizures and/or severe chronic headaches, and 193 matched manifestation-free participants) collected as part of a large community-based trial in Burkina Faso. A perfect agreement between the rT24H EITB and the native gp24 (and its homodimer, gp42) LLGP-EITB was found (kappa value of 1.0). Furthermore, among patients with the neurological manifestations of interest who underwent a computed tomography scan, the rT24H EITB and native antigen LLGP-EITB had a comparable ability to correctly identify NCC cases with multiple viable (rT24H: sensitivity: 80.0%), single viable (66.7%), and calcified/degenerating cysts only (25.0%), albeit for multiple viable and calcified cysts, the rT24H estimated sensitivity seemed lower, but more uncertain, than previously reported. The rT24H EITB specificity was high (98.2%) and in line with previous studies. This study confirms the value of the recombinant rT24H EITB as an alternative to the native antigen LLGP-EITB for the diagnosis of NCC in a SSA community setting.

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Supplemental Material

  • Received : 07 Jul 2017
  • Accepted : 30 Oct 2017
  • Published online : 26 Dec 2017

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