1921
Volume 88, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0002-9637
  • E-ISSN: 1476-1645

Abstract

Abstract.

Transmission by the oral route of is controversial. Our objective was to evaluate dairy products in the transmission of Q fever. Pasteurized, unpasteurized, and thermized dairy products were tested for by using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction specific for IS1111 and IS30A spacers, culturing in human embryonic lung fibroblasts cells, and inoculation into BALB/c mice. We tested 201 products and was identified in 64%. Cow milk origin products were more frequently positive than goat or ewe products ( = 0.006 and = 0.0001, respectively), and industrial food was more frequently positive than artisanal food ( < 0.0001). Food made from unpasteurized milk contained higher bacteria concentrations than food made from pasteurized milk ( = 0.02). All cultures were negative and mice did not show signs of illness. Farm animals are highly infected in France but consumption of cheese and yogurt does not seem to pose a public health risk for transmission of Q fever.

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  • Received : 03 Apr 2012
  • Accepted : 01 Aug 2012
  • Published online : 03 Apr 2013
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